Dr Rebecca Thomson

Dr Rebecca Thomson
 Position Senior Clinical Research Coordinator
 Org Unit Medical Specialties
 Email r.thomson@adelaide.edu.au
 Telephone +61 8 8161 8747
 Location Floor/Room 2 ,  WCH - Clarence Rieger Building ,   Womens & Childrens Hospital
  • Biography/ Background

    I have a background in nutrition and exercise physiology and an interest in the health benefits of physical activity and nutrition. My research has investigated how incorporating nutrition with exercise can lead to added benefits for health and exercise performance. In June 2015 I joined the Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity (ENDIA) study, Australia’s largest study investigating the causes of type 1 diabetes, as a project manager and nutrition researcher. I have also been investigating exercise recovery, including assessing fatigue and recovery status using heart rate and potential treatments to enhance recovery from muscle damaging exercise.

    I have extensive experience in managing large scale clinical trials investigating the effects of lifestyle modification on improving health and observational studies investigating the causes of type 1 diabetes. I have worked with a range of populations, from athletes to sedentary participants and children to older adults.

    I have a strong publication record relative to opportunity, with 27 high quality publications (17 first author), 372 citations and an H index of 9 (Scopus). Two of the papers from my PhD were included in the recent ‘Evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome’ and my work has also led to the registration of 3 patents (all pending). I am currently the Chair of the Nutrition Society of Australia Adelaide Group and have presented my work at 7 local, 9 national and 3 international conferences.

  • Qualifications

    2010     Certified Clinical Research Coordinator, Association of Clinical Research Professionals

    2009     Registered Nutritionist, Nutrition Society of Australia

    2009     Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Australia

    2005     Bachelor of Applied Science (First Class Honours), University of South Australia

    2004     Bachelor of Applied Science (Human Movement), University of South Australia

  • Awards & Achievements

    2016     Robinson Research Institute Travel Grant ($550)

    2014     Early Career Researcher International Travel Award, University of South Australia ($6,000)

    2012     Heart Foundation Travel Grant ($2,000), Supported Researcher ($1,500)

    2011    Finalist for Best Paper in Adult Clinical Research at ANZOS ASM, Supported Researcher ($1,500)

    2010     Supported Researcher at University of Australia ($1,500)

    2009    South Australian Young Investigator Award Semi-finalist, Nutrition Society of Australia (NSA) Student Travel Grant ($295), Student Prize (1st prize) for Best Oral Presentation at NSA Adelaide Group Student Presentation Night, Student Prize (3rd prize) for Best Oral Presentation at NSA ASM

    2008     Heart Foundation Travel Grant ($2000), Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society Student Travel Grant ($300), Nutrition Society of Australia Student Travel Grant ($50), Ross Wishart Finalist at the Australian Society for Medical Research (SA Division) Annual Scientific Meeting

    2006     South Australian Department of Health Research Award, Division of Health Sciences Top Up Scholarship

  • Research Interests

    Research Interests and Expertise

    • Role of diet and exercise in health, specifically how physical activity and nutrition can lead to improvements in health
    • Exercise recovery, including assessing fatigue and recovery status using heart rate and assessing potential treatments to enhance recovery from muscle damaging exercise
    • Role of nutrition during pregnancy and early life as a potential cause of type 1 diabetes in children
    • Expertise in conducting large-scale clinical studies evaluating the role of lifestyle treatments involving diet and physical activity for improving health
    • Certified Clinical Research Coordinator from the Association of Clinical Research Professionals which recognises my expertise and commitment to ensure my research is conducted according to the high international standards of the Good Clinical Practice principles

    Supervision and mentoring

    I am supervising 2 PhD students and have supervised 5 Honours students and 3 summer vacation students at the University of South Australia. I have also assisted in mentoring other honours and PhD students.

  • Research Funding

    Internal Funding

    1.       Thomson R. ‘A novel heart rate measure to prevent overtraining during Army recruit training’, Sansom Institute Small Grant Scheme. $10,000 (2013).

    2.       Buckley J, Tremellen K, & Thomson R. ‘Efficacy of a novel milk drink to improve oocyte health’, ITEK Pioneer Grant Scheme, ITEK Pty Ltd. $9,624 (2011).

    3.       Thomson R. ‘Tracking changes in exercise performance resulting from improvements in fitness or changes in fatigue state in competitive cyclists’, UniSA Divisional Research Development Grant. $8,388 (2011).

    4.       Buckley, J, Howe, P & Thomson, R. ‘Sports heart rate monitor application’, ITEK Catalyst Grant Scheme, ITEK Pty Ltd. $10,000 (2010).

    5.       Thomson R & Buckley J. ‘The effect of diet and exercise on vascular function in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’, University of South Australia Divisional Research Development Grant. $14,960 (2010-2011).

    External Funding

    1.       Buckley J, Thomson R, Karavirta L, & Robertson E. ‘Use of heart rate kinetics during the rest-exercise transition for tracking changes in exercise performance in athletes’, Australian Research Council Linkage Project. $100,000 (2014-2016).

    2.       Buckley J, Matsumoto-Hagio M, Thomson R, Bryan J, Howe PRC, & Coates A. ‘Efficacy of lutein-enriched milk for increasing physical activity participation in older adults’, Meiji Dairies Corporation. $61,000 (2011).

    3.       Buckley J, Thomson R, & Howe P.Efficacy of cycloidal vibration therapy for promoting exercise recovery’, Advanced Lifestyle International. $55,000 (2010-2011).

    4.       Advanced Lifestyle International Pty Ltd. ‘Soft Tissue damage and benefits of using cycloidal vibration therapy to promote recovery after exercise’, named as researcher on Researchers in Business Grant. $17,976 (2010).

  • Publications

    Publications

    1.         Thomson R, Buckley & Brinkworth, ‘Perceived exercise barriers are reduced and benefits are improved with lifestyle modification in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomised controlled trial’, BMC Women’s Health, 2016;16:14. (IF 1.50, 53/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology)

    2.         Bellenger, Fuller, Thomson R, Davison, Robertson & Buckley, ‘Monitoring athletic training status through autonomic heart rate regulation: A systematic review and meta-analysis’, Sports Med, 2016 Feb 18 [Epub ahead of print]. (IF 5.04, 1/81 Sport Sciences)

    3.         Bellenger, Karavirta, Thomson R, Robertson, Davison & Buckley, ‘Contextualising parasympathetic hyperactivity in functionally overreached athletes with perceptions of training tolerance’, Int J Sport Physiol Perform, 2015 Dec 1. [Epub ahead of print] (IF 2.66, 13/81 Sport Sciences)

    4.         Bellenger, Thomson R, Howe, Karavirta & Buckley, ‘Monitoring athletic training status using the maximal rate of heart rate increase’, J Sci Med Sport. 2015 July 10; [Epub ahead of print].  (IF 3.19, 7/81 Sport Sciences)

    5.         Thomson R, Bellenger, Howe, Karavirta & Buckley, ‘Improved heart rate recovery despite reduced exercise performance following heavy training: A within-subject analysis’ J Sci Med Sport, 2016;19(3):255-9. (IF 3.19, 7/81 Sport Sciences)

    6.         Thomson R, Brinkworth, Noakes & Buckley ‘Muscle strength gains during resistance exercise training are attenuated with soy compared with dairy or usual protein intake in older adults: A randomized controlled trial’ Clin Nutr, 2016;35(1):27-33. (IF 4.48, 9/77 Nutrition and Dietetics)

    7.         Thomson R, Rogers, Howe & Buckley ‘Effect of acute exercise-induced fatigue on maximal rate of heart rate increase during submaximal cycling’ Res Sports Med, 2015 Aug 20 [Epub ahead of print]. (IF 1.70, 33/81 Sport Science)

    8.         Moran, Thomson R, Buckley, Noakes, Clifton, Norman & Brinkworth ‘Steroidal contraceptive use is associated with lower bone mineral density in polycystic ovary syndrome’ Endocrine, 2015;50(3):811-15. (IF 3.88, 40/128 Endocrinology & Metabolism,  1 citation)

    9.         Dale, Thomson R, Coates, Howe, Brown & Buckley ‘Protein hydrolysates and recovery of muscle damage following eccentric exercise’ Functional Foods in Health and Disease, 2015; 5(1):34-43.

    10.     Fuller, Thomson R, Howe & Buckley ‘Vibration therapy is no more effective than the standard practice of massage and stretching for promoting recovery from muscle damage following eccentric exercise’ Clin J Sport Med, 2015;25(4):332-7. (IF 2.27, 18/81 Sport Science)

    11.     Thomson R, Coates, Howe, Bryan, Matsumoto-Hagio, Buckley ‘Increases in plasma lutein through supplementation are correlated with increases in physical activity and reductions in sedentary time in older adults’ Nutrients, 2014;6(3):974-984. (IF 3.27, 21/77 Nutrition & Dietetics, 1 citation)

    12.     Nelson, Thomson R, Rogers, Howe & Buckley ‘Maximal rate of increase in heart rate during the rest-exercise transition tracks reductions in exercise performance when training load is increased’, J Sci Med Sport, 2014;17:129-133. (IF 3.19, 7/81 Sport Sciences, 1 citation)

    13.     Thomson R ‘The impact of vitamin D on weight loss’, US Endocrinology, 2013;9(2):146-52.

    14.     Thomson R, Spedding, Brinkworth, Noakes & Buckley ’Seasonal effects on vitamin D status influence outcomes of lifestyle intervention in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’, Fertil Steril. 2013;99(6):1779-85. (IF 4.59, 4/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology, 6 citations)

    15.     Fuller, Thomson R, Howe & Buckley ‘Effect of vibration on muscle perfusion: a systematic review’, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. 2013;33:1-10. (IF 1.44, 66/73 Physiology, 6 citations)

    16.     Thomson R, Spedding & Buckley ‘Vitamin D in the etiology and management of polycystic ovary syndrome’, Clin Endocrinol. 2012;77(3):343-50. (IF 3.46, 48/128 Endocrinology & Metabolism, 30 citations)

    17.     Murphy, Thomson R, Coates, Buckley & Howe ‘Effects of Eating Fresh Lean Pork on Cardiometabolic Health Parameters’, Nutrients. 2012; 4(7):711-723. (IF 3.27, 21/77  Nutrition & Dietetics, 10 citations)

    18.     Thomson R, Brinkworth, Noakes, Clifton, Norman & Buckley ‘The effect of diet and exercise on markers of endothelial function in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’, Hum Reprod. 2012; 27(7): 2169-76. (IF 4.57, 5/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology, 9 citation) Reprinted in Human Reproduction Excerpted Edition for Russian 2012;5(29):44-51. 

    19.     Thomson R & Buckley ‘Protein hydrolysates and tissue repair’, Nutr Res Rev. 2011; 24(2): 191-197. (IF 3.91, 12/77 Nutrition & Dietetics, 1 citation)

    20.     Thomson R, Buckley & Brinkworth ‘Exercise for the treatment and management of overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a review of the literature’, Obes Rev. 2011;12:e202-210. (IF 8.00, 9/128 Endocrinology & Metabolism, 14 citations)

    21.     Thomson R, Buckley, Lim, Noakes, Clifton, Norman & Brinkworth ‘Lifestyle management improves quality of life and depression in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’, Fertil Steril. 2010;94: 1812-16. (IF 4.59, 4/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology, 43 citations)

    22.     Thomson R, Buckley, Noakes, Clifton, Norman & Brinkworth ‘Heart rate recovery improves after weight loss in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’, Fertil Steri. 2010; 93(4): 1173-1178. (IF 4.59, 4/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology, 7 citations)

    23.     Buckley, Thomson R, Coates, Howe, DeNichilo & Rowney ‘Supplementation with a whey protein hydrolysate enhances recovery of muscle force-generating capacity following eccentric exercise,’ J Sci Med Sport. 2010; 13: 178-181. (IF 3.19, 7/81 Sport Sciences, 25 citations)

    24.     Thomson R, Buckley, Moran, Noakes, Clifton, Norman & Brinkworth ‘Comparison of aerobic exercise capacity and muscle strength in overweight women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome’, BJOG Int J Obstet Gy. 2009; 116(9): 1242-1250. (IF 3.73, 9/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology, 17 citations)

    25.     Thomson R, Buckley, Moran, Noakes, Clifton, Norman, & Brinkworth ‘The effect of weight loss on anti-mĪ‹llerian hormone levels in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome and reproductive impairment’, Hum Reprod. 2009; 24(8): 1976-81. (IF 4.57, 5/79 Obstetrics & Gynecology, 42 citations)

    26.     Thomson R, Buckley, Noakes, Clifton, Norman & Brinkworth ‘The effect of a hypocaloric diet with and without exercise training on body composition, cardiometabolic risk profile and reproductive function in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’, J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008; 93(8): 3373-3380. (IF 6.21, 15/128 Endocrinology & Metabolism, 87 citations)

    Editorial comment published in Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey. 2009; 64(4): 244-245.

    27.     Thomson R, Brinkworth, Buckley, Noakes & Clifton ‘Good agreement between bioelectrical impedance and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for estimating changes in body composition during weight loss in overweight young women’, Clin Nutr. 2007; 26: 771-777. (IF 4.48, 9/77 Nutrition and Dietetics, 72 citations)

     

    Book Chapter

    Thomson RL, Teede HJ, Stepto NK, Banting LK & Moran LJ ‘The role of diet and lifestyle modification in the treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome’, In Nutrition, Human Fertility and Reproductive Function. Editors K Tremellen & K Pearce. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group, LLC, Boca Raton, FL, Mar 2015; p 27-50.

     

    Invited Presentations

    1.       Nutrition Society of Australia and Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology Food for Thought: A nutrition careers and networking evening, October 17, 2014.

    2.       University of Leeds, UK, Institute of Psychological Sciences, Grand Research Challenge Seminar Series: Health & Wellbeing and Behaviour Change, July 15, 2014. ‘The effects of diet and exercise interventions on women with polycystic ovary syndrome’.

    3.       South Australian Cardiovascular Health Research Network Early Career Researcher Showcase Event, September 21, 2011. ‘The effect of diet and exercise on vascular dysfunction and other cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome’.

     

  • Professional Associations

    Nutrition Society of Australia (2014-16 Chair, 2013 Treasurer, 2011-12 General Committee Member Adelaide Group)

    Association of Clinical Research Professionals

    Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society

    European College of Sport Science

    Healthy Development Adelaide

    South Australian Cardiovascular Health Research Network (2011-12 Early Career Researcher Working Group)

  • Community Engagement

    As Chair of the Nutrition Society of Australia Adelaide Committee I have helped organise numerous public seminars and popular dinner events matching speakers with courses so the public can learn about health benefits and processes behind growing or manufacturing, while enjoying a tasty meal with others interested in food and nutrition.

    Since 2013 I have volunteered at ‘Science Alive!’ and preschools, leading interactive activities to engage children in nutritional sciences and provide families with an understanding of healthy food choices. This sparked my passion about promoting science to children and I engaged with the Scientists in Schools Program at Sturt Street Community School conducting nutrition science activities and promoting science to female students.

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Entry last updated: Thursday, 9 Aug 2018

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