Working towards a smarter, greener airport

Adelaide Airport's tarmac at twilight. The airport has entered into a three-year partnership with the University's Centre for Energy Technology to develop clean energy solutions.
Photo courtesy of Adelaide Airport Limited

Adelaide Airport's tarmac at twilight. The airport has entered into a three-year partnership with the University's Centre for Energy Technology to develop clean energy solutions.
Photo courtesy of Adelaide Airport Limited

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Wednesday, 24 November 2010

Adelaide Airport aims to become an Australian leader in clean energy use thanks to a new three-year, $750,000 partnership with the University of Adelaide.

Under the partnership - launched today by Transport and Energy Minister the Hon. Patrick Conlon - the University's Centre for Energy Technology (CET) will undertake research to develop clean energy solutions for Adelaide Airport.

Minister Conlon today commended Adelaide Airport Limited and the Centre for Energy Technology for forging a partnership that would have long-term benefits.

"This partnership further enhances South Australia's reputation as a leader in 'clean and green' technologies and sustainable business practices," Minister Conlon said.

"The commitment from Adelaide Airport to invest in the University of Adelaide's research will support innovation and provide both parties with strategic benefits. We are firmly supportive of new initiatives that will lead to new technologies that improve the environment, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in South Australia."

Adelaide Airport Limited (AAL) Managing Director, Phil Baker, said AAL aimed to become the most ecologically sustainable airport in Australia.

"Running a successful airport involves a great deal of energy use, which in turn results in a large amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Simply putting money into paying for carbon offsets doesn't solve the underlying issues," Mr Baker said.

"At Adelaide Airport, we want to invest in the long-term future of our operations. This is why we have approached the Centre for Energy Technology at the University of Adelaide to partner with us to find cleaner, greener solutions."

In order to help reduce AAL's carbon footprint, University staff and postgraduate students will assess the airport's biggest areas of energy use and develop clean energy solutions that are specifically targeted to make the most impact.

"Usually, the biggest percentage of any large organisation's carbon footprint is the direct result of energy use, so it makes perfect sense for the Centre for Energy Technology to partner with Adelaide Airport on this major project," said the Director of CET, Professor Gus Nathan.

"We're excited by the foresight and leadership on this issue being shown by Adelaide Airport. We anticipate significant benefits from this partnership, not only for the airport but also for other public spaces, such as shopping centres and other airports overseas, in clean technology," he said.

Specific issues to be investigated under the partnership include:

  • the use of renewable energy generation both on and off site - such as wind and solar energy
  • novel methods to reduce energy from heating, cooling and lighting
  • alternative approaches for ground transportation
  • adapting new technologies to AAL's unique facilities and requirements.

"In addition to any benefits Adelaide Airport might receive from this partnership, our high visibility to the public makes this a perfect opportunity to raise community awareness of the long-term benefits of sustainable energy," Mr Baker said.

The funding for this partnership will also support two scholarships for University of Adelaide PhD students to work on clean energy projects.

 

Contact Details

Mr David Ellis
Email: david.ellis@adelaide.edu.au
Website: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/news/
Deputy Director, Media and Corporate Relations
External Relations
The University of Adelaide
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