Public lecture: human bond with animals is growing

University of Adelaide vet nurse Tammy McClelland with 'Teddy'.
Photo by Randy Larcombe.

University of Adelaide vet nurse Tammy McClelland with "Teddy".
Photo by Randy Larcombe.

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Professor Gail Anderson at the Veterinary Health Centre, Roseworthy Campus, University of Adelaide.
Photo by Mark Dohring.

Professor Gail Anderson at the Veterinary Health Centre, Roseworthy Campus, University of Adelaide.
Photo by Mark Dohring.

Full Image (109.83K)

Thursday, 3 February 2011

The bond between humans and animals has become more significant in the last 20-30 years, according to a University of Adelaide veterinary expert.

In the first of the University's free public Research Tuesdays seminar series for the year, Professor Gail Anderson will highlight the roles of animals in our lives in all their various forms.

"Ever since humans began to domesticate animals some 20,000 years ago, the bond between people and animals has been growing," says Professor Anderson, who is Head of the School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences, based at the University of Adelaide's Roseworthy Campus.

"The human-animal bond is complex, it varies between cultures, and it has changed enormously over the last few decades," she says.

Professor Anderson says the role of domesticated animals - dogs and cats - has been changing for many years now.

"These animals have increasingly been seen as family members and moved from the kennel to the couch. How do these changed perceptions play out in modern life, and what are the implications for the mental and physical health of our society?"

Professor Anderson says that while production animals serve us as food and fibre sources, "increasingly we ask how we might make protein production more sustainable with respect to energy and water consumption".

"And while many animal species are considered appropriate to eat, their welfare is gaining increased attention and their housing, transport and food supply sources of greater awareness with the general public. How do we continue economic and environmentally sustainable production of the protein that is increasingly demanded by developing populations?

"As veterinarians and animal scientists, we touch on all of these issues - and many others - in various ways. This talk will highlight some of the areas of research addressing these issues and where our new School may play a role in advancing knowledge in South Australia and beyond."

WHAT: Animals in Society - from fork to friend Research Tuesdays free public seminar
WHERE: Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide
WHEN: Tuesday 8 February, 5.30pm-6.30pm
RSVP: bookings essential on 08 8303 3692 or email: researchtuesdays@adelaide.edu.au

Please note: this event is now fully booked. A podcast and video will be available on the Research Tuesdays website after the presentation:

www.adelaide.edu.au/researchtuesdays/

The University of Adelaide's Vet School runs a Companion Animal Health Centre (for cats, dogs and other pets) at the Roseworthy Campus. Open to the public, the Companion Animal Health Centre is a commercially run part of the Veterinary Health Centre. For more information about the Companion Animal Health Centre or to make bookings, phone 08 8313 1999 or go to: www.adelaide.edu.au/vetsci/centres

 

Contact Details

Professor Gail Anderson
Email: gail.anderson@adelaide.edu.au
Website: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/vetsci/
Head, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
The University of Adelaide
Business: +61 8 8313 7826


Mr David Ellis
Email: david.ellis@adelaide.edu.au
Website: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/news/
Deputy Director, Media and Corporate Relations
External Relations
The University of Adelaide
Business: +61 8 8313 5414
Mobile: +61 (0)421 612 762