Festival of Learning and Teaching 2021 - Blended Futures

Prof Phil Levy

Professor Phil Levy
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)

EVENT POSTPONED DUE TO CURRENT COVID19 SITUATION

A new date for this event will be announced later in the year.

Contact teachexcellence@adelaide.edu.au with any questions.

 

We define blended learning as face-to-face learning supported by digital content and online activities. The Adelaide approach will prioritise high-engagement face-to-face learning experiences, underpinned by best-practice digital content delivery and online activities.

This year’s event will be held over two half days Thursday July 22 (on campus) and Friday July 23 (online).

The focus of this year’s Festival is “Blended Futures”, providing an opportunity for us to celebrate and share new approaches to blended learning at Adelaide, and to explore future directions. It is an exciting time for education delivery and practice across the sector, with the disruption of 2020 widely recognised as a catalysing, ‘no going back’ moment in the digitalisation of learning, teaching and assessment. Flexible, blended learning models are here to stay, with high-engagement face-to-face learning experiences underpinned by best-practice digital content delivery and online activities. 

What new models of blended learning are Adelaide educators developing, across the disciplines, informed by the 2020-21 student and staff experience? What are we learning from our growing experience of online learning and teaching? How can we use digital technologies both online and in the face-to-face classroom to build strong learner engagement? How can we best support equity, diversity and inclusion in blended learning, and our students’ wellbeing? What are the new opportunities to enhance students’ engagement with industry, and their experiences of assessment and feedback in learning? What are the challenges of supporting mixed cohorts of face-to-face and remote learners? As we shape new approaches, it will be timely, too, to reflect on foundational values and principles. The FOLT will provide an opportunity to explore these questions and more with colleagues and students from Adelaide and with two International Keynote Speakers who are both leading experts in digital higher education. 

Rapid Fire Presentations and Workshops will feature, focussing on any aspect of Blended Futures, with a special focus on the sub-themes of: 

  • Innovations in Blended Learning
  • Embedding Work-Integrated Learning
  • Innovations in Assessment and Feedback

Professor Phil Levy
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)

 


 

Sian Bayne

Professor Sian Bayne 
Professor of Digital Education and Director of Education at the Edinburgh Futures Institute

 

Join friends and colleagues at the University of Adelaide's premier event for educators and those working in Learning and Teaching.

Register to attend the Festival here

Julie Greenwood

Julie Greenwood
Vice Dean for Educational Initiatives, EdPlus at Arizona State University

Day 1 Keynote Presentatio

Professor Sian BayneProfessor of Digital Education at the University of Edinburgh, Director of Education at the Edinburgh Futures Institute and Assistant Principal for Digital Education

Day 2 Keynote Presentation

Dr Julie GreenwoodVice Dean for Educational Initiatives at Arizona State University

View Thursday program here

View Friday program here

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  • Keynote Speaker Biography - Dr Julie Greenwood

    As the Vice Dean for Educational Initiatives, Dr. Greenwood works with the academic units at all ASU campuses, including deans, department chairs, faculty and staff to strengthen online programming and drive course development that transforms student learning experiences.
    In this role, Julie oversees Instruction Design and New Media, Assessment and Compliance, Adaptive and Personalized Learning, and the EdPlus Action Lab, leveraging data analytics and educational technology to improve and equalize degree completion.
    In addition, she is the EdPlus liaison to the University Innovation Alliance and the APLU Personalized Learning Consortium. Julie received her Ph.D. from the Neuroscience Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and is Associate Professor in the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences in New College at ASU. 

  • Keynote Speaker Biography - Professor Sian Bayne

    Sian Bayne is Professor of Digital Education and Director of Education at the Edinburgh Futures Institute (https://efi.ed.ac.uk/). She directs the Centre for Research in Digital Education (http://www.de.ed.ac.uk/) at the University of Edinburgh, where her research is currently focused on higher education futures, interdisciplinary approaches to researching digital education and digital pedagogy. She is also Assistant Principal for Digital Education at the university. She is one of the authors of The Manifesto for Teaching Online, recently published by MIT Press (https://sianbayne.net/countdown-the-manifesto-for-teaching-online-book-is-out-in-september/). She led the Near Future Teaching project to design a values-based future for digital education, the final report of which is available here (https://www.nearfutureteaching.ed.ac.uk/outcomes/). More information about her work is on her web site at: http://sianbayne.net

    Sian gives regular keynotes on the future of digital education, publishes widely and has conducted research funded by UKRI, Erasmus+, AdvanceHE and NESTA.


Festival Program

Times are subject to change

 

Day 1
Thursday 22nd July - On Campus (North Terrace)

Time Session Venue
1:00pm Opening of Festival and Welcome to Country with Cliff Wilson Napier 102 Lecture Theatre
1:10pm Directions for Blended Learning at the University of Adelaide by Professor Phil Levy Napier 102 Lecture Theatre
1:30pm Move to workshop locations  
1:40pm

Interactive Workshops


Workshop 1. Facilitating excellent practical learning while minimising risks.  Facilitated by Anne Hewitt, Kathryn Bowd, and the Employability Community of Practice. 


Workshop 2. Shaken not stirred?  Blending a cocktail of active group work with mixed cohort ingredients.  Facilitated by Beth Loveys, Hayley McGrice, and the Discovery Learning Community of Practice.


Workshop 3. What role, if any, do large (100+) lectures have in a blended future?  Facilitated by Cheryl Pope, Cornelia Koch, Raymond Vozzo, Michelle Coulson, Gareth Pritchard, John Murphy & Elizabeth Beckett.


Workshop 4. The impact of directed teacher presence in improving student engagement and performance in a remote learning context.  Facilitated by Hasti Abbasi, Paul Moss, Tania Crotti, Lyndsey Collins-Praino.  

 

 

Napier 210

 

Hughes 323

 


Napier 108  

 

 

Hughes 322

2:25pm Tea & Coffee Break Napier Foyer
2:50pm

Rapid Fire Presentations followed by Q & A 

Aboriginal Culture through storytelling in 360 video.  Presented by Dr Kam Kaur, John Murphy, Rod O'Brien, Frank Wanganeen.


Using FLOW-3D to offer virtual laboratories in water engineering teaching.  Presented by Jessica Bohorquez, Wei Zeng, Byron Guerrero.


Blended Learning: Content, Community & Covid.  Presented by Brie Willoughby-Knox.


Multiple learning and administrative advantages when an advanced course in genetics adopted a “flipped-classroom” format with continuous, online assessment.  Presented by Michael Lardelli.

Napier 102
Lecture Theatre

3:25pm

Rapid Fire Presentations followed by Q & A 

Choose your own assignment. Presented by John MacLean.


Enabling the 360- Feed-forward Cycle through an Effective Partnership with PASS Student Leaders.  Presented by Kayoko Enomoto and Rebecca Leung.


Integrating Ethics – Using real case studies. Presented by David Hunter.


Managing the risks of discrimination and harassment for legal intern. Presented by Anne Hewitt and Stacey Henderson.

Napier 102
Lecture Theatre

4:00pm Stretch break  
4:10pm International Keynote Speaker - Professor Sian Bayne, Professor of Digital Education and Director of Education at the Edinburgh Futures Institute. Napier 102 Lecture Theatre (Speaker via Zoom)
5:00pm Closing Remarks by Professor Phil Levy Napier 102 Lecture Theatre
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  • Thursday 1:40pm - Workshop Abstracts

    Facilitating excellent practical learning while minimising risks.

    Facilitated by Anne Hewitt, Kathryn Bowd, and the Employability Community of Practice. 

    Around the world work-integrated learning (WIL) is being embraced as a strategy to facilitate student transition to employment.  WIL can involve a placement in a workplace, involvement in an industry project, work in a clinical context or even learning in a simulated workplace. Engaging in these opportunities can help students develop a range of skills, including communication, time management and professional interaction, and can build professional networks that can help them post-graduation. 

    But  WIL is not without risk.  Students in a workplace may be subject to harassment or bullying, or suffer a workplace injury.  Ethical issues may arise in relation to the work students are asked to complete.  Their host may not provide adequate supervision, or the tasks they undertake may not support quality learning outcomes.  And a WIL placement may not conform with TEQSA and other educational regulations.

    This workshop will be presented by the Employability Community of Practice, and will explore what constitutes high quality WIL, and how it can be designed to avoid some of these risks.  Participants will be introduced to a range of quality and risk indicators, and have the opportunity to engage in practical analysis of scenarios, to develop their own understanding of how to design and run great WIL opportunities with a minimum of risk.


    Shaken not stirred? Blending a cocktail of active group work with mixed cohort ingredients.

    Facilitated by Beth Loveys, Hayley McGrice, and the Discovery Learning Community of Practice.

    Take your blended learning techniques to the next level as the Active Learning and Assessment and Discovery Learning Communities of Practice actively engage you in a mixed cohort experience!

    Guided by facilitators from these communities of practice this workshop will be run in one of the University’s flagship mixed cohort teaching spaces. 
    This will provide you with an opportunity to see how bespoke learning environments can enable design of best practice group activities.

    You can choose to participate either in person or online to explore how this learning space caters to a mixed cohort of remote and on campus students.

    You will work in mixed groups to design a group activity and discover benefits and challenges of the collaborative process experienced by both students and staff.

    We hope this workshop will support you in navigating the challenge that is the cocktail of 21st century learning and teaching.

    Limited places are filling fast!

    Don’t forget to shake not stir!


    What role, if any, do large (100+) lectures have in a blended future?

    Facilitated by Cheryl Pope, Cornelia Koch, Raymond Vozzo, Michelle Coulson, Gareth Pritchard, John Murphy & Elizabeth Beckett.

    Do large class meetings serve any role in a blended future or are they no longer relevant or of benefit to students? Join this workshop as we present research and experience on this question and work together towards identifying pedagogical benefits and challenges through the lens of academics, students and professional/learning support staff. We will explore alternatives and provide a framework to help you decide whether this format is right for your course. 


    The impact of directed teacher presence in improving student engagement and performance in a remote learning context

    Facilitated by Hasti Abbasi, Paul Moss, Tania Crotti, Lyndsey Collins-Praino.  

    Research confirms there is a positive correlation between quality of teaching presence and student outcomes (Wendt & Courduff, 2018). This workshop is based on the findings of a comprehensive project that investigated whether changes to teacher-student communication in a blended space would affect student outcomes at the University of Adelaide.
     
    Data was collected from large cohort courses delivered via MyUni during semesters 1 of 2019 and 2020. 11 courses matched the criteria of demonstrating modified/revised online learning resources and improved student performance. Of these, two courses, Human Biology (HB) for Nursing (320 students) and Foundations of Human Neuroanatomy (FHN) for Anatomy and Pathology, were investigated further to understand why students’ average marks in HB increased by +13.5 and by +17.057 in FHN in 2020 compared to 2019. This workshop will share lessons learned from this investigation.
     
    In this interactive workshop, participants will generate a word map of elements they feel comprise ideal communication within a course. Then, using the findings of the analysis and their courses as examples, presenters will demonstrate how to engage students and improve their academic performance by developing and implementing directed communication strategies that are grounded in pedagogy. Participants will then engage in a small group activity to critically appraise their own communication practice in the blended space and to create a shared document (infographic) that will be used to inform future practice in this area. 

  • Thursday 2:50pm - Rapid Fire Presentation Abstracts

    Aboriginal Culture through storytelling in 360 video. 

    Presented by Dr Kam Kaur, John Murphy, Rod O'Brien, Frank Wanganeen.

    In 2020-21, Dr Kam Kaur collaborated with Aboriginal Elders and Learning Enhancement and Innovation (LEI, DASE) to design, record and produce a 360 Video resource on Aboriginal cultural knowledge along the River Torrens. 

    Evidence-based principles were used to design and create the immersive, blended learning experience, bridging technology and pedagogy and linking to learning outcomes.

    The LEI Media Production team recorded a Welcome to Country by Uncle Rod O'Brien and a Cultural Tour by Uncle Frank Wanganeen in 360 Video. They then generated animations matched to music with historical images to develop the immersive, interactive experience for students. 

    This blended learning resource is being used at Wirltu Yarlu with positive feedback from on campus and remote students. It could potentially be used across the University to support the Indigenous Curriculum. 

    Acknowledgements: Fred Agius (Kaurna Elder) John Murphy (Learning Design); Dave Johnston, James Donovan, Aaran Shannon-Honson (LEI Media Production Team)


    Co-authors names
    Dr Kam Kaur (Academic Lead) Rod O'Brien, Frank Wanganeen, Fred Agius, (Aboriginal Elders); John Murphy (Learning Design); Dave Johnston, James Donovan, Aaran Shannon-Honson (LEI Media Production Team)


    Using FLOW-3D to offer virtual laboratories in water engineering teaching. 

    Presented by Jessica Bohorquez, Wei Zeng, Byron Guerrero.

    uly 2020. It was time to plan out Water Engineering and Design course. Laboratories are an essential part of this course, but they were no longer an option with the Covid-19 situation. It was time to innovate. Industry projects with no access to physical laboratories conduct numerical modelling to assess water infrastructure design. Then, why not take advantage of the simulation tool FLOW-3D to expose our students to virtual laboratory sessions? This process involved research, planning and brand new content development from the teaching team. What started as an alternative to a conventional course activity quickly started showing important advantages. It allowed for the exploration of topics that are not typically covered in laboratories, it exposed students to complex but highly desired skills in the workforce and it inspired school academics to create Honours and Master projects around FLOW-3D. Now it is July 2021. Do we want to go back to the traditional laboratories? Why not make the best out of both worlds?

    Co-authors names
    Wei Zeng, Byron Guerrero and Martin Lambert


    Blended Learning: Content, Community & Covid. 

    Presented by Brie Willoughby-Knox.

    Robust blended learning experiences are more important now than ever in the COVID era of quick pivots between modes of delivery. Blended learning design has created opportunities to “abandon flawed approaches to teaching and learning” (Owston et al., 2012, p. 340) and create a widespread adoption of transformative practices that go beyond imitating traditional practices (Torrisi-Steele & Drew, 2013). The LEI design and development team working on the Allied Health Project is taking up those opportunities and creating meaningful blended learning experiences. We are using innovative approaches to bridge online, classroom and real-world learning experiences on several concurrent dimensions. In this short talk, I will share some of the strategies and tools that we use to blend two key dimensions of learning: content and community. The main implications are for future-proofing courses and continuing to evolve our shared understanding of what learning and teaching can look like. 


    Multiple learning and administrative advantages when an advanced course in genetics adopted a “flipped-classroom” format with continuous, online assessment. 

    Presented by Michael Lardelli.

    We instituted a flipped-classroom learning environment for teaching advanced undergraduate genetics that consisted of pre-recorded lecture material followed by face-to-face workshops. Student engagement was promoted, and learning reinforced, by a recursive arrangement of electronically delivered formative and summative multiple choice question assessment in every workshop instead of a final end of semester examination. Our teaching approach dramatically increased student attendance, and student engagement with instructors. It simplified examination administration, and adapted easily to the online-only requirements of the SARS-CoV2 pandemic of 2020. The majority of student feedback regarding the revised learning format was positive. A manuscript describing the course structure and student and instructors experience with it is available at EdArXiv Preprints: https://edarxiv.org/7dr94/

  • Thursday 3:25pm - Rapid Fire Presentation Abstracts

    Choose your own assignment. 

    Presented by John MacLean.

    I want to discuss a strategy for formative assessment: an assignment structure in which students generally know their mark before their assignment is marked. 
    A common target for formative assessment is to provide on-the-fly feedback, feedforward, etc. My goal here was to efficiently bypass much of the difficulties of providing on-the-fly feedback by communicating an escalating goal structure to students. 
    The result was "the clearest assignment I've ever had," an assignment in which students temporarily forgot marks while they fought to move up my established goal structure. 
    I'll quickly present the idea, then move to an open forum discussion in which you can criticise or improve on it. 


    Enabling the 360- Feed-forward Cycle through an Effective Partnership with PASS Student Leaders. 

    Presented by Kayoko Enomoto and Rebecca Leung.

    Language students require practical experiences of using the target language, just as science students do through their practical/laboratory sessions. More time is also required for students to learn non-cognate languages (e.g. Japanese) than cognate languages (e.g. German). In this regard, maximising our Japanese language students’ course engagement stands paramount in our course delivery. There is the strong need to systematically embed an effective communication pathway connecting the teaching team with students’ realities and to hear their voices. This need was facilitated creatively through partnering with PASS Leaders. Drawing on the Student as Partners framework, we present a collaborative course delivery model, the 360° Feed-forward Cycle consisting of three dimensions in Japanese 2A. This innovative approach enabled realistic anticipation and proactive addressing of content-related difficulties and, crucially, student experience and well-being issues, whilst also providing the Japanese 2A team with a heightened sense of cohesion and mutual support. 


    Integrating Ethics – Using real case studies. 

    Presented by David Hunter.

    In this brief presentation I will address one strategy for dealing with a common issue in ethics teaching to professionally focused students - namely that the student's focus in their first years is often on what they consider the core knowledge for their future role - rather than how to behave well in that role for example. I will discuss how using cases drawn from students in later years involved in work-integrated learning can work as an effective way to assess those students but also provide a rich and engaging resource for cases for students in earlier years of study. 


    Presented by Anne Hewitt and Stacey Henderson.

    Employers increasingly expect graduates (including legal graduates) will already have practical workplace experience. At the same time, we are recognising that bullying, discrimination and sexual harassment are endemic in our society, including in the law. Students undertaking WIL are particularly vulnerable, as they are often inexperienced, desperate to develop the employability skills and industry contacts, and needing to complete the placement to obtain course credit. Given this, Law Schools have a social, moral, and legal obligation to support and protect our students’ learning in the workplace. 

    This presentation will explain the nature of this problem, explore existing resources to educate students about their workplace rights, and introduce a new Law School project to create resources which are specific to legal workplaces which can inform students of their rights, assist them to recognize and respond to inappropriate workplace behaviours, and for workplaces, and those in them, to engage in positive change.


Day 2
Friday 23rd July - Online

Time Session Format
9:00am Opening of Day 2, and Acknowledgement of Country Zoom Webinar
9:15am International Keynote Speaker - Dr Julie Greenwood, Vice Dean for Educational Initiatives, EdPlus at Arizona State University.  Presentation then Q & A. Zoom Webinar
10:05pm Comfort Break  
10:30am Panel Discussion  Zoom Webinar
11:15am

Rapid Fire Presentations (pre-recorded) followed by live Q & A

Work-Integrated Learning Activities in the Translation and Interpreting Program: which are popular and cost effective? Presented by Hong Cai.


Positioning for future careers.  Presented by Saira Ali.


Using the Five-Microskills Method in Veterinary and Medical Sciences Clinical Teaching.  Presented by Kiro Petrovski and Roy Kirkwood.


Blended by Design.  Presented by Cheryl Pope.


Adapting to Blended learning - undergraduate pathology and pharmacology course.  Presented by Rachael Farrington and Abdallah Salem.

Zoom Webinar
12:00pm Closing Remarks by Professor Phil Levy Zoom Webinar
12:10pm Festival Close Zoom Webinar
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  • Friday 11:15am - Rapid Fire Presentation Abstracts

    Presented by Hong Cai.

    In this presentation, I will share four types of work-integrated learning activities implemented in the Master of Arts (Interpreting, Translation and Transcultural Communication; MAITTC) program between 2019 and 2021. In order to enhance students’ skills and competencies required for a professional interpreter and develop their workforce readiness, I take a four-step approach. The activities from the first three steps are work simulation, which includes fully structured role-playing scenarios in the lab, semi-structured role-playing scenarios with Year 2 Medical School students and unstructured live-action scenarios with Year 6 Medical School students in Adelaide Health Simulation. The activities in the fourth step are work shadowing, in which students go to the field (e.g. hospitals) to observe practitioners’ interpreting. Students’ feedback and reflections are collected and analysed to better understand the pros and cons of these activities and how to further improve work-integrated teaching and learning. Furthermore, I will also discuss how collaborations with the Medical School and practitioners have made these activities replicable and cost-effective. 


    Positioning for future careers. 

    Presented by Saira Ali.

    As a first-year Bachelor of Media core course, MDIA 1020 Media Professions and Identities provides opportunities to begin scaffolding knowledge and understanding of media careers and professionalism from the start of the program. Exploring the changing nature of media professions and the role of communications professionals in different sectors in the very first year of their degree, allows students to position themselves in response to possible future careers and career pathways. The course content and assessments facilitate this process by encouraging reflection as well as acquisition of practical skills such as developing content for digital platforms, applying for an advertised job in their preferred field of media work, practicing professional communication forms (including correspondence and resumes), report writing and building personal brands. These activities are further complemented by opportunities for networking with industry professionals via special guest presentations and mentorship programs.
     


    Using the Five-Microskills Method in Veterinary and Medical Sciences Clinical Teaching.

    Presented by Kiro Petrovski and Roy Kirkwood.

    Teaching clinical reasoning is a challenge in the medical sciences (e.g., dental, pharmacy, medical, veterinary) as many lack adequate training in clinical teaching. In this workshop, we propose the use of the five-microskills (FMS or the one-minute preceptor) model of clinical teaching as a tool that can be used not only in teaching during clinical encounters but also during traditional teaching sessions (e.g., practicals). The FMS model 
    • assists the instructor in estimating the level of knowledge and development of the learner
    • allows for providing feedback
    • is applicable in the busy clinical or teaching schedule of the instructor
    • requires training only of the instructor (1 – 4 hours recommended), not the learner
    We will provide two brief examples of the use
    • clinical encounter in veterinary clinical practice
    • biochemistry practical
    Expected outcomes:
    • From the examples, the basis of the model and start using can be extracted and implemented in clinical and other teaching.

     


    Blended by Design. 

    Presented by Cheryl Pope.

    As many of our courses were subject to emergency transition in response to COVID-19, one course transitioned seamlessly (for the students at least!) A lot of the reason for this success is that the course was designed from scratch to be a blended course making use of technology to increase the opportunities for students to engage and challenge themselves at scale (this course has around 800 students) and using valuable face-to-face time for interactive activities. In this presentation, I highlight the key design decisions and how these mapped to learning technologies in MyUni and the impact for students.


    Adapting to Blended learning - undergraduate pathology and pharmacology course.

    Presented by Rachael Farrington and Abdallah Salem.

    Taking lessons learnt from last year’s teaching and assessment modifications to the delivery of the course in response to the COVID19 situation, we have been able to create a supportive self-directed blended learning environment for health and medical science students. This second year course provides a general introduction to pathology and basic pharmacological concepts together with principles needed to understand mechanisms of disease and treatment.

    The use of H5p to create interactive videos allowed us to break-up tutorial/ case-based learning content with imbedded questions to keep students engaged and facilitate remote learning. This approach allowed us to exploit the pedagogic advantages of the interactive online material and assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the course content. This presentation will report on students’ preferences for online and face-to-face resources which allowed them to choose their own style of learning and provide a useful way of revision.

 

 


 

 


Previous Festivals

 

Festival of Learning and Teaching 2020

For the first time the Festival of Learning and Teaching was held fully online.  The Festival theme, Looking Back, Looking Forward’, offered a great mix of provocative keynotes from leading sector voices and stimulating presentations, workshops and panels delivered by University staff and students.  For more information visit the 2020 event page.

 

Festival of Learning and Teaching 2018 

Held on the 20th of July 2018, the theme for the eighth Festival of Learning and Teaching was What Works? Perspectives on Feedback and Assessment.  The Keynote was presented by Professor Elizabeth Molloy, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne.  For more information visit the 2018 event page.