Journal metrics

It may be helpful to demonstrate the impact or prestige of the journals in which you have published articles.  

You can do this by highlighting the impact factor, quartile, or ranking of a journal. (Be aware that not all grant schemes require or allow this – you will need to check the requirements for the relevant scheme). 

Some disciplines (Arts, Business) have their own lists or rankings of prestigious journals (see below).

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  • Journal Impact Factor (JIF)

    The Journal Impact Factor is “a measure reflecting the annual average (mean) number of citations to recent articles published in that journal.”

    You can find the JIF for a journal using these tools: 

    • Web of Science 
      - From the Results page of an article search, click on the journal name. JIF, Journal Rank in subject category, and Journal quartile (Q1, Q2, etc.) are given. 
      OR 
      - From the article main page, scroll down to Journal Information and click the link to Journal Citation Reports to see a detailed report (including JIF, ranking, and quartile) for that journal. 

    • Journal Citation Reports – from Web of Science, select the Journal Citation Reports tab (from the top of the screen) and search for your journal to see a detailed report (including JIF, ranking, and quartile). 

  • SJR (Scimago Journal Rank)

    SJR is weighted by the prestige of a journal. Subject field, quality and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation. SJR also normalizes for differences in citation behaviour between subject fields.  

    You can find the SJR for a journal using these tools: 

    • Scimago Journal Rank – search for a journal by title to see SJR indicator 

    • Scopus – from the Document Details page for an article, click the journal name. Information includes SJR, SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper), CiteScore and subject category ranking/percentiles. 

  • Journal rankings, quartiles, percentiles

    It is a good idea to look at ranking, quartile and percentile information for journals, as this often conveys greater meaning in a grant application than the JIF or SJR indicator alone. 

    Additionally, a journal may have a low impact factor on a global scale, but be highly regarded in its subject field or geographical region. Citation culture also plays a part; for example, medical researchers tend to cite others’ work more frequently than mathematics researchers.  

    • Web of Science 
      - From the Results page of an article search, click on the journal name. JIF, Journal Rank in subject category, and Journal quartile (Q1, Q2, etc.) are given. 
      OR 
      - From the article main page, scroll down to Journal Information and click the link to Journal Citation Reports to see a detailed report (including JIF, ranking, and quartile) for that journal. 

    • Journal Citation Reports – from Web of Science, select the Journal Citation Reports tab and search for your journal to see a detailed report (including JIF, ranking, and quartile). 

    • Scopus – from the Document Details page for an article, click the journal name. Information includes SJR, SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper), CiteScore and subject category ranking/percentiles. 

  • Subject-specific lists of journal quality/esteem